Los Angeles in the early 1960s…

New York dominated the art world in the late 1940s-1950s but Los Angeles artists competed with their East Coast brothers/sisters in what was to become an art scene specific to Southern California. The Ferus Gallery and a group of artists represented by Ferus embraced materials, processes and a level of ultimate finish that took the art world by storm! Led by curator Walter Hopps and director Irving Blum, the Ferus Gallery quickly became THE avant-garde center in the visual arts for Greater Los Angeles. Among the leading Ferus Gallery artists were Billy Al Bengston, De Wain Valentine, and Helen Pashgian. These three Ferus artists pursued, in their own signature fashion, sensuous colors, beautiful, pristine surfaces, and innovative fabrication processes—often from the industrial world—to create seamless and bright, color-fueled works of art.

Bengston, Valentine, and Pashgian often blurred the so-called boundaries of mediums—i.e., painting and sculpture—in favor of renewed appreciation for handcrafted objects intimately connected to and tied to the rapidly advancing industrial production capabilities within the mass-culture that Los Angeles was fast becoming!

What are your thoughts on the Southern California artists who embraced Finish Fetish in their signature creative processes and intent? Looking at their work displayed in a gallery or museum, you become quickly aware of the incredible amount of craftsmanship involved, the time-consuming commitment to labor to achieve such perfect surfaces, and, in most cases, an appreciation for the manual dexterity displayed by these artists behind the making of these works. Ironically, none of their efforts of toil or struggle are visible as the surface glistens with a purity rarely seen. These three art objects really need to be seen in person, just saying!

Billy Al Bengston, Buster, 1962
De Wain Valentine, Large Wall, 1968
Helen Pashgian, Untitled, 1968-69

Published by: roberttracyphd

Academic professor at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. I teach theory courses in Art and Architecture History. In addition, I also curate exhibitions on campus as well as in other venues nationally and internationally.

34 Comments

34 thoughts on “Los Angeles in the early 1960s…”

  1. I think this artwork is very unique. The glossy finish and bright contrasting colors attract viewers. This type of art is very industrial like mentioned above. It is something that the average artistic person would not know how to create. I think this is what makes the art so interesting. Having this idea and actually creating it is two different things and the creation is where the impressiveness comes to play.

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  2. Within the past year or so, I’ve grown a fascination with the finish fetish. I think these artists who focus so much on surface and finish have brought in a new visual interest. It also leaves the viewer, like myself, often perplexed with how it’s possible to get such a pristine looking finish. Prior to learning about finish fetish, I had such a fixation on how the surface of my sculptures looked. A big aspect of my sculptures relies heavily on having seamless surfaces. So when I discovered artists who focus so heavily on finish fetish, I became completely captivated by it. Visually it brings something new to the way we look at art. And technically it’s something that requires a lot of skill; these artists have really raised the bar of craftmanship and I think that’s something to admire.

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  3. I think this form of art work is extremely beautiful!! Just by the photos I can see the different impression on colors and they really are an amazing match. The deep blues, hues of orange, and rich chocolate browns it just gives you this feeling of life. The Helen Pashgian “Untitled” is eye capturing. I do wish I could see this in person. When I look at this I think of words like cleverness, patience, and mystery. I hadn’t heard of the term Finish Fetish before and I am glad I did learn because these artists really show bright technique. This is gifted art.

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  4. Though finish fetish artwork is not typically the type to inspire my own style in graphic design, the types of gradients that can be achieved with the smooth surfaces and mixes of colors in this type of work is fascinating. As a fan of cooking and competition shows, I was always especially interested in watching the sugar pulling artists do their thing, as these elements to group compositions always seemed to look the most unique in its glass like appearance. These finish pieces have a lot of potential to look other-worldly and the fact that they can look completely different in varying lighting and angles– even more so than other, flatter artworks– gives them an edge. I’d definitely be interested in seeing more pieces, like the ones above, in person.

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  5. I think from an artistic standpoint, as we’ve discussed in previous blog posts, that art is not only about the finished product but the process that an artist goes through when they’re creating a piece. I think the artists embracing a new sort of medium for their artistic pieces is fantastic and the pieces that they’ve created look stunning. It really does tell you something that they’ve gone through quite a long and strenuous art process to come to a piece like the ones that they have.

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  6. Truthfully I have never heard of the “Finish Fetish” and this is my first time seeing these works by the L.A. artists. While these works do not particularly pertain to me in my graphic design and illustration style and designs, there is something inspiring about them. These pieces really impress me because I have no idea how they are made, and even if I did there would be no way I could ever recreate them. As mentioned above the craftsmanship is incredibly impressive, whether it be in “Large Wall” with it’s smooth angles and large scale, or “Untitled” with its seamless gradient and seemingly perfect spherical shape. The use of resin, or what I can only assume is resin creates an extremely professional look making it hard to believe that it is handcrafted. Resin is quite hard to work with and the fact that “Large Wall” has seemingly no air bubbles or imperfections in the surface at such a large scale is crazy to me. Overall, I think this is an art form that I want to look into and discover more about their processes and see other works by these artists.

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  7. This is a type of work that is very polished and pristine. While the genre of art is not my favorite, I think that all art should be appreciated and I can greatly admire the amount of work that goes into something to this degree. I think most people do not realize how work and effort it takes to produce such a stunning and seamlessly polished piece. When displayed in a gallery, viewers only see the finished product, not the work that goes into it and if you’re not an artist or not familiarized with the art processes than you may have difficulty understanding the level of hard work and dedication that goes into such a thing. Overall, I think these pieces have a beautiful quality to them in their finished forms.

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  8. I would actually applaud those artists in Southern California who embraced the Finish Fetish and their intent on it because first off, it is my first time seeing this kind of art. Second off, I firmly believe this form of art process deserves some recognition. I really can’t imagine how time consuming and dedicated each artist took to create one of these works of art. The colors are quite mesmerizing to my eye and can almost feel surreal to even look at. My question is just mainly “how?” Nowadays it seems too easy to replicate those effects in digital arts or 3d art, but to see it in real life and know that they were made by-hand is incredible skill. Especially not knowing the hardships the artist must of had during the process aside from the “flawless” finished product we see in the end. The behind the scenes is what none of us viewers ever know and I think it’s important to take a step back and question the process and know that not everything is easy as it seems. Each piece of work has their ups and downs and detailed processes and to be able to see the finished work must be very rewarding. I’d definitely love to see these kinds of pieces in person!

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  9. I think it’s wonderful to see what these artists achieved and how well-crafted the pieces are. Personally, this reminds me of oddly satisfying gifs and images, where it consists of ideas such as the artworks shown here. I think this really circles around all the ideas we’ve been talking about, the process. The process of fabricating something that is seemingly flawless and is completely handmade takes the whole idea of what people are capable of versus products that are entirely made from machines.

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  10. To me the emerging Los Angeles art scene paved the way for what modern art would soon become. Not necessarily as a whole, but major aspects of it. While NYC did a lot for the American art scene in the modern day, something about what was going on in So Cal was different, and new. It really showed how much of average day life played into art and could influence it. We also see art beginning to be influenced by all sorts of different hobbies and lifestyle and the interconnection that we now see today. Its obvious how important general art is to the car scene, motorcycle scene, and skate and surf lifestyles but I never truly realized where and how parts of it were started. I also have a better understanding of why these things go so hand in hand. This is the one thing I felt lacked with the NYC art scene; in LA you were more than an artist, or at least thats how it’s been portrayed. On the East coast it has always seemed, and still does, that you are an artist and nothing more. On the West your hobbies, interests and things outside of art matter second to your art. You are a person that makes art, rather than just an artist.

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  11. Before reading about Finish Fetish, I didn’t know how this art scene came about and the efforts it took to explore this phenomenon. Now that I know a little more, I am really amazed and fascinated by this style of art and the idea of using new materials and fabrication techniques to create immaculate surfaces. Not only has this style of art opened up new options for sculpture, it distinctly defines objects based on its surroundings, giving it new life and beauty. I can definitely notice the immense amount of detail and observation artists put into their art objects from the colors, seamless shapes, and brilliant surfaces that unify and interact. We feel compelled to see if it’s truly crafted by hand, if there are lights embedded within the object, and if these forms distort with our perceptual senses. As I explore different art from different time periods, I continue to find more ways to appreciate the uniqueness and experiments with the creative process.

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  12. The ability of the artists to capture and manipulate these washes and swirls of vibrant colors within these structures is extraordinary. Additionally, the amount of time and effort that is required to make such a pure and polished surface is admirable. Not only are the artworks themselves beautiful and pristine, but they seem to radiate and reflect a light and glow around them. They both impact and are impacted by their environment, in a sense, making these artworks ever-evolving and never at a standstill. As their appearances change with the setting and the light, they are not fixed or stagnant. I can imagine that viewing these works in person allows one the unique opportunity to discover something new within these pieces as they are able to walk around the piece itself and see how the light changes it directly. This creates a new experience and opportunity within each setting it is placed. While I was not entirely aware of the Finish Fetish style of art before this class, now that I have been introduced to this form of sculpture, I can truly appreciate its unique artistry.

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  13. I find these art pieces to be incredibly wonderful. When looking at them at face-value, without much context of the creation process, it could easily make anyone think that it is “simple”. Which is certainly far from the truth! Looking at it closer, you realize the amount of time put into these things, and it makes you really appreciate the art form. I can only imagine the amount of patience required to make these, and it only further builds my respect for these artists. Redefining sculpture and the use of unique coloring patterns, Finish Fetish truly has something incredibly special.

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  14. When looking at these works I am immediately reminded of 3d models created in digital software. The pristine and glossy quality of each piece is very similar to the kind of shine you can achieve when modeling a 3d object and putting in the appropriate lighting engine. The fact that these hand made works from the 1940-1950s are able to stand on par with what I have seen people do with the latest technology is really something. If I were ever able to see this in person I would definitely be even more impressed, because it’s one thing to see a picture of these works and its another thing to see it right in front of you with no barrier.

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  15. I have always thought that New York arts are more traditional and conservative. I believe the works of California differ in that they experiment more with color and texture that you can see in real life; it is for sure innovative. The colors and the clean textures make me want to note that I am not looking at the arts, but I am emotionally feeling them. When I look at three artworks, I love the vibrating colors and texture looking as if they are certain objects in space. I really respect the craftsmanship and the ability of the artists which I can feel it from the work’s elaborately detailed finishes.

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  16. I think the artists who embraced Finish Fetish into their works ended up creating something that is really satisfying to look at. A lot of art pieces tend to leave the audience in awe, but with pieces like the ones shown above, they’re incredibly satisfying to look at. These types of things are easy to look at, but I think that a lot of people will end up forgetting that this took a lot of time to sculpt/paint. The process and dedication for creating these pieces must have been insane, and at the end of the day the viewers won’t have any idea of what happened behind the scenes. Pieces like these that give the perception and feelings of “perfect” really highlight the capabilities that humans can attain even in things such as art.

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  17. For me, I believe that those artists that embrace Finish Fetish just want to create that sort of modern sleek look that we may see in modern high end homes or other locations. The modern look in many things often is simple yet clean, and efficient. In this case, we can say that it is clean and pleasant to look at. There isn’t technically too much busyness in the work, but that just reinforces the idea of simple and pleasant. I certainly respect the artists that attempt to achieve this because surely they may not be too entirely sure when they may finish if otherwise.

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  18. I think that this work is part of an ongoing conversation between artistic innovation, and technological innovation. The Finish Fetish movement created these masterful works that have a type of West coast vibe that seems familiar to me. It makes me wonder exactly how many other works within architecture, and film could be inspired by this movement. Billy Al Benson’s Buster, is a good example of contemporary, and pop art design being pushed to new limits. The industrial likeness in these works have an interesting camouflage that will most likely be unveiled in an up close and personal space. The Finish Fetish movement sparked my interest, and I would like to see some of these in person for further study.

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  19. I’ve seen art like this before, but I never knew the name. I love works like these- the glossy finish is really satisfying. All of the clean, smooth edges, along with the bright colors of the pieces, make this type of art really interesting. It is also interesting to see the contrasting style of the work we’ve studied in New York and the east coast compared to the “finish fetish” art of LA. It’s such a big difference, and I’m excited to see the different styles examined more.

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  20. Lizbeth Ramirez | Art 477

    I had no idea “Finish Fetish” was a thing. So when looking at the Southern California artists It’s something cool and different that I’ve been introduced to. Its crazy to me how one can achieve such a perfect polished look. Its beautiful and definitely admirable. It’s so satisfying that the objects are so clean. I would love to see them in person because it’s not the same online.

    Like

  21. These pieces are amazing! They’re very polished and the paint looks very smooth, as if it was pigment already mixed with glass and shaped as desired. It shows what multiple artists could accomplish for one piece alone. As someone who likes to sculpt, paint, and draw, I wish I could see these in person. That last piece is fascinating on it’s own; very clean looking. That first piece kind of looks like an optical illusion and eat yellow circle seems to be perfectly placed. I never have heard of “Fetish Finish” but it is definitely much better than it sounds.

    Like

  22. ART 477 ART Since 1945

    Dear Professor Tracy,

    When analyzing the Southern California artists who embraced “Finish Fetish” in their creative processes and intent, one cannot help but admire Billy Al Bengston, De Wain Valentine, and Helen Pashgian. In their signature fashion, these three artists pursued and created works that took the world by storm. “Finish Fetish” helped the Ferus Gallery of Southern California quickly become known as the place to see “Avant-Garde Art” and the center in the visual arts for Greater Los Angeles. Which when you see the art, you can truly understand why.

    I can see a new style when looking at these pieces—Finish Fetish, never seen before. The unique style is “Finish Fetish,” When you look upon the elements, one can see the smooth, fastidious, vivid, lustrous, industrial influences in the works. What makes the pieces of art exciting or more attractive to myself, as an artist, not only the beautiful, pristine surfaces, as well as the innovative fabrication process—as seen in the industrial world—but the story of its conception and the thought process of the artist that created these pieces. The more physically pristine or detailed one’s work gets one significant aspect that intrigues me. My personal preference is to understand the craftsmanship involved, the trials and tribulations that an artist faces (which often goes unseen) when creating such a new work of art. Craftsmanship should be as important to everyone, yet, it is not. Still, without a proper understanding of the artist’s method, an average viewer’s perception of the work can ultimately end up with them saying that the art is” simple” or” lacks complexity.” Understanding that these three artists blended the mediums of painting and sculpture to connecting it to the advancing industrial components that were making up the Greater Los Angeles area at the time.

    Sometimes, understanding how much work and the thought process of the artist is not understood or appreciated. However, knowing the time and effort spent to create the piece can increase its value for those who lack the knowledge of its construction and thus increasing the viewers’ appreciation. I am grateful that the “Finish Fetish” transpired and looked forward to seeing these pieces in person one day.

    Kindest regards,

    Sydney-Paige CeCe Kay

    Los Angeles in the early 1960s–ART 477

    Like

  23. ART 477 ART Since 1945

    Dear Professor Tracy,

    When analyzing the Southern California artists who embraced “Finish Fetish” in their creative processes and intent, one cannot help but admire Billy Al Bengston, De Wain Valentine, and Helen Pashgian. In their signature fashion, these three artists pursued and created works that took the world by storm. “Finish Fetish” helped the Ferus Gallery of Southern California quickly become known as the place to see “Avant-Garde Art” and the center in the visual arts for Greater Los Angeles. Which when you know the art, you can truly understand why.

    I can see a new style when looking at these pieces—Finish Fetish, never seen before. The unique style is “Finish Fetish,” When you look upon the elements, one can see the smooth, fastidious, vivid, lustrous, industrial influences in the works. What makes the pieces of art exciting or more attractive to myself, as an artist, not only the beautiful, pristine surfaces, as well as the innovative fabrication process—as seen in the industrial world—but the story of its conception and the thought process of the artist that created these pieces. The more physically pristine or detailed one’s work gets one significant aspect that intrigues me. My personal preference is to understand the craftsmanship involved, the trials and tribulations that an artist faces (which often goes unseen) when creating such a new work of art. Craftsmanship should be as important to everyone, yet, it is not. Still, without a proper understanding of the artist’s method, an average viewer’s perception of the work can ultimately end up with them saying that the art is” simple” or” lacks complexity.” Understanding that these three artists blended the mediums of painting and sculpture to connecting it to the advancing industrial components that were making up the Greater Los Angeles area at the time.

    Sometimes, understanding how much work and the thought process of the artist is not understood or appreciated. However, knowing the time and effort spent to create the piece can increase its value for those who lack the knowledge of its construction and thus increasing the viewers’ appreciation. I am grateful that the “Finish Fetish” transpired and looked forward to seeing these pieces in person one day.

    Kindest regards,

    Sydney-Paige CeCe Kay

    Los Angeles in the early 1960s–ART 477

    Like

  24. ART 477 ART Since 1945

    Dear Professor Tracy,

    When analyzing the Southern California artists who embraced “Finish Fetish” in their creative processes and intent, one cannot help but admire Billy Al Bengston, De Wain Valentine, and Helen Pashgian. In their signature fashion, these three artists pursued and created works that took the world by storm. “Finish Fetish” helped the Ferus Gallery of Southern California quickly become known as the place to see “Avant-Garde Art” and the center in the visual arts for Greater Los Angeles. Which when you know the art, you can truly understand why.

    I can see a new style when looking at these pieces—Finish Fetish, never seen before. The unique style is “Finish Fetish,” When you look upon the elements, one can see the smooth, fastidious, vivid, lustrous, industrial influences in the works. What makes the pieces of art exciting or more attractive to myself, as an artist, not only the beautiful, pristine surfaces, as well as the innovative fabrication process—as seen in the industrial world—but the story of its conception and the thought process of the artist that created these pieces. The more physically pristine or detailed one’s work gets one significant aspect that intrigues me. My personal preference is to understand the craftsmanship involved, the trials and tribulations that an artist faces (which often goes unseen) when creating such a new work of art. Craftsmanship should be as important to everyone, yet, it is not. Still, without a proper understanding of the artist’s method, an average viewer’s perception of the work can ultimately end up with them saying that the art is” simple” or” lacks complexity.” Understanding that these three artists blended the mediums of painting and sculpture to connecting it to the advancing industrial components that were making up the Greater Los Angeles area at the time.

    Sometimes, understanding how much work and the thought process of the artist is not understood or appreciated. However, knowing the time and effort spent to create the piece can increase its value for those who lack the knowledge of its construction and thus increasing the viewers’ appreciation. I am grateful that the “Finish Fetish” transpired and looked forward to seeing these pieces in person one day.

    Kindest regards,

    Sydney-Paige CeCe Kay

    Los Angeles in the early 1960s–ART 477

    Like

  25. ART 477 ART Since 1945

    Dear Professor Tracy,

    When analyzing the Southern California artists who embraced “Finish Fetish” in their creative processes and intent, one cannot help but admire Billy Al Bengston, De Wain Valentine, and Helen Pashgian. In their signature fashion, these three artists pursued and created works that took the world by storm. “Finish Fetish” helped the Ferus Gallery of Southern California quickly become known as the place to see “Avant-Garde Art” and the center in the visual arts for Greater Los Angeles. Which when you see the art, you can truly understand why.

    I can see a new style when looking at these pieces—Finish Fetish, never seen before. The unique style is “Finish Fetish,” When you look upon the elements, one can see the smooth, fastidious, vivid, lustrous, industrial influences in the works. What makes the pieces of art exciting or more attractive to myself, as an artist, not only the beautiful, pristine surfaces, as well as the innovative fabrication process—as seen in the industrial world—but the story of its conception and the thought process of the artist that created these pieces. The more physically pristine or detailed one’s work gets is one significant aspect that intrigues me. My personal preference is to understand the craftsmanship involved, the trials and tribulations that an artist faces (which often goes unseen) when creating such a new work of art. Craftsmanship should be as important to everyone, yet, it is not. Still, without a proper understanding of the artist’s method, an average viewer’s perception of the work can ultimately end up with them saying that the art is” simple” or” lacks complexity.” Understanding that these three artists blended the mediums of painting and sculpture to connecting it to the advancing industrial components that were making up the Greater Los Angeles area at the time.

    Sometimes, understanding how much work and the thought process of the artist is not understood or appreciated. However, knowing the time and effort spent to create the piece can increase its value for those who lack the knowledge of its construction and thus increasing the viewers’ appreciation. I am grateful that the “Finish Fetish” transpired and looked forward to seeing these pieces in person one day.

    Kindest regards,

    Sydney-Paige CeCe Kay

    Los Angeles in the early 1960s–ART 477ART 477 ART Since 1945

    Like

  26. For whatever reason, I keep trying to post but the cite kicks me out and says that I already posted, but I do not see it posted. It also keeps asking for my password for Word Press.

    So I am attaching the post herewith. I will try again tomorrow to see if it is posted.

    ART 477 Art Since 1945 Due October 19, 2020

    Dear Professor Tracy,

    When analyzing the Southern California artists who embraced “Finish Fetish” in their creative processes and intent, one cannot help but admire Billy Al Bengston, De Wain Valentine, and Helen Pashgian. In their signature fashion, these three artists pursued and created works that took the world by storm. “Finish Fetish” helped the Ferus Gallery of Southern California quickly become known as the place to see “Avant-Garde Art” and the center in the visual arts for Greater Los Angeles. Which when you see the art, you can truly understand why.

    I can see a new style when looking at these pieces—Finish Fetish, never seen before. The unique style is “Finish Fetish,” When you look upon the elements, one can see the smooth, fastidious, vivid, lustrous, industrial influences in the works. What makes the pieces of art exciting or more attractive to myself, as an artist, not only the beautiful, pristine surfaces, as well as the innovative fabrication process—as seen in the industrial world—but the story of its conception and the thought process of the artist that created these pieces. The more physically pristine or detailed one’s work gets is one significant aspect that intrigues me. My personal preference is to understand the craftsmanship involved, the trials and tribulations that an artist faces (which often goes unseen) when creating such a new work of art. Craftsmanship should be as important to everyone, yet, it is not. Still, without a proper understanding of the artist’s method, an average viewer’s perception of the work can ultimately end up with them saying that the art is” simple” or” lacks complexity.” Understanding that these three artists blended the mediums of painting and sculpture to connecting it to the advancing industrial components that were making up the Greater Los Angeles area at the time.

    Sometimes, understanding how much work and the thought process of the artist is not understood or appreciated. However, knowing the time and effort spent to create the piece can increase its value for those who lack the knowledge of its construction and thus increasing the viewers’ appreciation. I am grateful that the “Finish Fetish” transpired and looked forward to seeing these pieces in person one day.

    Kindest regards,

    Sydney-Paige CeCe Kay

    Los Angeles in the early 1960s–ART 477ART 477 ART Since 1945

    >

    Like

  27. I really like the look of Finish Fetish art. I think its mainly to do with how mesmerizing things look when they have a think shiny coat over it. This look of making everything shiny reminds me of the chrome obsession in the 90’s where everybody wanted everything to be chromed out. I wish I could see these pieces in person but from what I see in the pictures they definitely look really cool.

    Like

  28. This course is the first time I have seen these art works and have heard of the finish fetish. This style really caught my interest, and I am really curious to see other artists and works that embrace the finish fetish. It is extremely memorizing to look at. The glossy and seamless looks of the surfaces are quite pleasing to the eye, and I especially love Untitled, by Helen Pashgian. I keep going back to this piece, and can’t imagine how much time and effort went into creating these works of art, or even how they created them. I really wish I could see these in person because I feel like the photos do not do them justice compared to viewing them in person.

    Like

  29. I hadn’t heard of the finish fetish art before, and the work done in this context dragged me into a strange place. Using various synthetic materials and advanced materials such as plastics, Fetish-Finish was a pro-high production technology approach. The final product somehow displayed a pristine quality that gave an industrial feel. I can say that I am very impressed. Still, in this period, which coincides with the art center’s move from New York to Los Angeles, I cannot help but think that the extraordinary nature of the finish fetish movement is driving the marketing purpose.

    Like

  30. I would definitely want to see them in person! I want to see what kind of reflection it creates, and their appearance under the gallery light. It is hard to imagine how many time the artists spent. What if they run into any mistakes? They must have planned thoroughly in order to minimize the mistakes. I am drawn by Helen Pashgian’s Untitled, the transition between blue and orange is beautiful, as well as the transparent halo around it. I discovered this link that introduces Pashgian’s Golden Ratio: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uNGStjyvJok They are satisfyingly gorgeous. I also found this link that features Pashgian talking about her inspiration: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHj2vEPuelw. She mentioned her views in transparency, and how she played around with the chemicals.

    Like

  31. This style of art is just so amazing to look at. I love how pristine it looks. I love that the Ferus Gang developed this art style that is unique to Southern California. The Finish Fetish is just so unique and clean and I cannot get over the vibrant colors that are used, it is all so mesmerizing!

    Like

  32. I have a deep respect and appreciation for this kind of work. The commitment of labor and time to create something so perfect. I think it is also so human: our fascination with creation and perfection. Human loves working with our hands and touch things. To create something so perfect and shiny has been something humanity have been obsessed with since our origin because of our survival instincts and need for water.

    Like

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