“I never violate an inner rhythm”. (Lee Krasner)

Painter Lee Krasner was active in the New York School of Abstract Expressionists (aka A. E. artists) while living in Greenwich Village. Like most of the A. E. artists in the Village, Lee was keeping her eye out for opportunities to show her work. But Lee didn’t let looking for exhibition venues district her from quality time in the studio. Over many years of active studio activity, Lee learned a great deal about her self. She did willingly step back to promote her rising star husband—Jackson Pollock—but both Pollock and Lee had studios at their Hampton residence.

After Jackson’s death, Lee rejuvenated her career and began to make her way into the inner sanctum that was the New York City gallery scene. She was still referred to as Jackson Pollock’s wife, but Krasner would not be distracted. She was able to get some group and solo exhibitions and slowly built her own repetition separate from Jackson. Lee was well trained as she pursued education/mentoring from faculty at Cooper Union, National Academy of Design, the famed Art Students League of NYC, and extended study with Hans Hofmann.

These educational experiences molded Lee in terms of character, understanding herself, and learning communication/expressionist skill as a painter. During her formative years after Jackson’s death, Lee would have opportunities to speak with young, emerging artists as well as patrons at exhibition openings. Lee consistently acknowledged her growing years being mentored by artists. Lee was fond of saying the following:

“The key is what is within the artist. The artist can only paint what she or he is about…I need to be alone for certain periods of time or I violate my own rhythm…I never want to violate an inner rhythm. I loathe to force anything. I don’t know if the inner rhythm is Eastern or Western. I know it is essential for me. I listen to it and I stay with it. I have always been this way. I have regards for the inner voice…At that point it certainly would be called abstract. That is to say, you had a model and there’d be one or two or three people there drawing the model but otherwise you had abstractions all around the room, even though the model was in front of you.”

What are your thoughts when you read an artist telling you she needs” to be alone for certain periods of time or I violate my own rhythm? Do you suspect this “alone time” may be applied to situations outside the artist’s studio?

Lee Krasner, Untitled, 1940

Lee Krasner, Untitled, 1948

Lee Krasner, Untitled, 1949

Published by: roberttracyphd

Academic professor at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. I teach theory courses in Art and Architecture History. In addition, I also curate exhibitions on campus as well as in other venues nationally and internationally.

45 Comments

45 thoughts on ““I never violate an inner rhythm”. (Lee Krasner)”

  1. I feel like having alone time, especially as an artist in any form, helps you form your own authentic creative ideas. It is respectively an artist right to want some alone time to be able to think about and flow with their own work. When you are around so many people trying to be creative it may throw you off. You can feel as though your ideas are not your own. That you are collecting other peoples thoughts or opinions.
    I do think her alone time can be anywhere. A stroll in the park, in her bed room etc. Whatever makes her feel comfortable.

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  2. Alone time, at least for me, is important as it helps you regroup your thoughts. Continuing to push through your work, artistic or not, can create a block. Taking the necessary time alone allows for you to distance yourself from whatever it was you were doing. When you come back to work on your art or anything else at that matter, you will have a fresh perspective and new ideas.

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  3. I think that this is something almost, if not all, artists can relate to. Artist tend to be solitude-seeking and aware of their emotional states. Art is something that often channels subconscious emotions and thoughts, portraying what you”inner-self” is feeling and often used as an outlet. What Kresner is referring to by stating that she “needs to be alone from time to time” or she “violates” this inner rhythm, speaks to the understanding that she has of her own emotions and what she needs to portray in her art. Finding solitude and being aware of what messages and emotions you are portraying in your work is one of the most important thing as an artist. To be aware of these things, you first have to be aware of yourself and your subconscious. Often times, people get caught up in life and the people and events around them. It is important to take a step back and re-center yourself and your ideologies, not only as an artist to produce great and true work, but in your daily life.

    These thoughts and processes can be applied to every day life as well as the world of art. Life is something that cannot be controlled completely and it is important to take a step back and realize your own self and the tole you play in your owl life as well as others to maintain a good “rhythm.”

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  4. I think when a professional artist publicly announces that they need alone time it is likely for good reason. Many artists that are able to make a living out of art tend to be very dedicated to making art for many hours a day continuously in order to produce work. I don’t remember who I watched specifically, but there was an artist in a documentary I watched that explained that working on a set schedule is much better than just waiting for inspiration to strike. So, when an artist takes a break it must be because they are completely and thoroughly burnt out, or they are preparing for something big that needs sufficient behind the scenes work to take place before they get to actually producing the artwork. As such I find it totally understandable that and artist would need some alone time so they wouldn’t mess up their rhythm.

    As for situations not related to art, there are many times when a person needs “alone time”. People both in and out of the creative fields need some time to self reflect or just calm down for a bit before continuing on with what they were doing. For a computer engineer they could need to take a walk and stretch and for an athlete they might listen to some music. The ways they handle their alone time may be different, but it’s all the same at it’s core in being a way to distance themselves from something else in order to gain a mental breath of fresh air.

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  5. I definitely agree that “alone time” can be applied to situations outside the artist’s studio and especially inside the studio. As an artist myself, being alone can give a great advantage to not be overstimulated by the things happening in our lives whether it is affecting us or those around us. It can even be for world problems that can affect someone mentally and/or physically. There needs to be a balance for the artist to keep on their feet, and as Lee said, “from violating their own rhythm.” We need to be stable mentally and physically to put in our 100% into a piece of work or else the results will fail us and frustrate us to the point we cannot work on what we’re working on and deal with the frustrations. It’s nice for anyone to be in their own state of mind and relieve themselves in a more peaceful environment to do what they need to do from any unfinished business. It can help relieve any built up stress or emotions getting in the way after long days of holding whatever could have been held inside that no one but them knows.

    Dealing with everyday problems can be very tiring and stressful and will eventually create what is called “art block.” The creativity isn’t there to create anything and left staring at a blank canvas. We don’t want to relieve our frustration out on our works of art which can mess up what was planned out to be, unless it’s under a circumstance where it can be transformed into maybe an abstract piece of work to show emotion through your work. But other than that, it is not the best idea since all the head will be filled with is any personal struggles one if going through and won’t be able to do anything unless it is dealt with to continue on.

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  6. I believe that alone time is essential to finding comfort with yourself and identifying your own needs and opinions, whether you are an artist or not. It can be difficult to sort through your own creative ideas and motivations if you are oversaturated by the artists and the world around you. Taking the time to be alone with yourself and identify your unique creative processes and ideas is very important. It is an opportunity for the artist to work through their thoughts and emotions. I agree that this may take place in the studio as well as this time being spent creating new work or it taking place in other aspects of one’s life. This awareness of one’s inner self allows the artist to come to know their own artistic vision and the emotions, ideas, and world perspective that create its foundation.

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  7. I believe all artists are capable of extreme inner reflection and introspection as art can be a visual representation of such concepts. Everyone needs time to be with themselves and for some, they might require more time than others. Krasner mentioning that she needs to stick to her natural rhythm is understandable, if not reminding of the self care that people need to take for themselves. Her rhythm can include listening to her thoughts and intuitions and if she finds that being distracted or being away from her solitude dilutes that, then giving time to herself is important. Recalibrating your thoughts and intentions, no matter in regards to what, is healthy and vital to growth and development of your mind and perspective. Which, in turn, is helpful in art.

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  8. To be by oneself without the disturbance of others, alone in your thoughts, the eventuality of facing your faults, your pleasures, and your frailty is certain. As an artist, self-awareness is the one thing that I find similar within other artists. It is important for me to be introspective so that I can fully visualize and express myself through whichever art medium I prefer. Stepping back from everyone else also helps seeing everything you’ve done thus far, its impression, without any disruption from anyone else’s comments. I think that’s what she meant the most by ‘violate an inner rhythm’. Being surrounded by others, you immediately soak up other peoples’ energy, and they can have a direct effect on you. Once you take some time for yourself to reflect that energy that you were fed, it will give you time to heal your own energy and thus become more self-reflective which could benefit your work.

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  9. Lizbeth Ramirez | Art 477

    My thoughts when I read Lee’s quotes saying she needs “to be alone for certain periods of time or I violate my own rhythm” I immediately thought, Me too. I feel as an artist or as a human in general it’s important to be alone with yourself. It’s a way of getting to know you and taking some time from the world’s distractions. So yes I would think this “alone time” applies to situations outside of the studio. It’s a necessity. This time can be used in many different scenarios, personally for me I like to use it to focus on my work and figure out what my next move is. I might also use it for self care or to just get away from chaotic environments and situations. I like to agree that if I don’t set aside some alone time I violate “my own rhythm” in the sense that I can’t find any clarity. Without it, things tend to build up and I become overwhelmed or have an Artist Block. So It’s essential to use time to regather your thoughts and regain that clarity within yourself.

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  10. I think it is always important to take time for yourself. It doesn’t even have to be necessarily for art-related topics but for anything. I think having that time to yourself allows you to reflect and gather your thoughts for the next task you want to accomplish. It is interesting how she mentions the rhythm. I am also the same way. Whenever I am trying to create or get in a mindset to work, finding that workflow/rhythm is so important. On the other hand, it is important to have support and people that can help you get through tough times. So I think there needs to be a balance between the two.

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  11. Painter Lee Krasner had an interesting idea about “rhythm” and her need to maintain it. Her request for “alone time” is not strange. As for some of the people I know, myself included, a “time out” or “alone time” can be necessary if we want to achieve better results. Not just in our studio, but an all types of work. Personally, I go on runs in more remote places to create a physical and meditative place where I can process my thoughts. Taking time to isolate oneself, and fine tune this “rhythm” that Lee Krasner mentions, could be more efficient than spending that time to push through stacks of work. I also believe that Lee Krasner could be trying to create a state of flow. Anything produced during a state of flow could have better quality. Waiting until one achieves a productive state of mind may also be a way of training the mind how to work. After doing this repetitively, the mind could exclude other thoughts and emotions, knowing that it should only do work when it is in the proper “rhythm”. Much like an athlete trains nerves and muscles to work in a very specific way for a certain event.

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  12. I think the idea of “alone time” can be very subjective. There are times when “alone time” can be defined as needing a break, a refresher, or a pause, and sometimes “alone time” can be the need to pull oneself away from influences and distractions and continue thinking on their own. I think alone time can be inside or outside of the studio, as it all depends on how that person wants to spend their alone time. I also think that alone time doesn’t necessarily mean one is isolating themselves away from others, but more of the idea of taking oneself out of the physical workplace and spending their time however they feel fit. Personally, I think alone time has a direct link to one’s sanity. When it comes to life, there’s a lot of things that we must balance: school, work, family, but most importantly ourselves. Needing that sense of alone time restores our energy and gives our minds a sense of ease.

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  13. Krasner citing alone time as part of her rhythm is understandable. I think we’ve all had the need to be alone once or twice. Alone time is useful for getting those creative juices flowing, and calming down when things get overwhelming. I certainly understand the need for alone time. I get distracted easily by pretty much everything around me- it’s much worse when there are people with me. Being alone is the best way for me to work. Beyond just that though, people may need alone time just to refresh themselves so they can come back with a clear head. Whether to continue what they were working on or to get more ideas, it’s understandable. And the idea of alone time can be applied everywhere, not just art- sometimes stepping away from people is necessary, for peace of mind. Without it, it would likely be very difficult to stay sane.

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  14. Lee Krasner talks about finding the creativity in the self and creating art based on what is within and I feel like for any artist that is true, whether you’re creating for someone else or as a personal piece, there always has to be some sort of inner emotion and motivation that comes in your creative process. Without that process of creating alone and following that inner rhythm, I feel like your creative process doesn’t flourish. More often than not, in order to create work you can look outwards for inspiration but the creation and push past the boundaries of the inspiration come from thinking alone.

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  15. I feel that when making personal work, alone time is highly valuable. As Krasner states, it’s not something that you want to violate. From my own personal experience, having this alone time, or this inner rhythm violated, can completely shift your mood and the headspace in which your art is taking place. This inner rhythm, is integral to the individuality that comes with being artist, specifically when it comes to making personal pieces. Therefore having that alone time is what allows for this inner rhythm to flourish and is where you can let your inner rhythm completely spill onto the canvas. I find there is also a sort of cycle that comes with this in that, the more alone time you have the more ideas come to the surface, and when you’ve created enough, you can get back to that alone time.

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  16. When an artist says they want to be alone, the case isn’t always that they are shy or feeling burnt out; most of the time they just feel inspired and need to expand on an idea. As an artist, it is easy to get caught up with the motions because when you have those small, blessed moments of inspiration, it would be a shame to forget it from worldly distractions. This can apply outside the studio when artists need time for themselves, to prioritize themselves over their art. Artists may need to take a break from the world to create, but they need to take a break from art to take care of themselves as well.

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  17. As an artist, I definitely understand both sides of things when it comes to needing to be alone for art, or even just needing to be alone due to personal reasons. Art can be a mentally straining process, whether it means going into personal emotional territory for an art piece, or simply making a piece that has a lot of thought into it. And this in general, can require a lot of focus and a lot of mental strain–so it is no wonder that some artists need a break from people, especially when they’re feeling especially inspired, or even drained. Of course, this does not necessarily excuse people being flatout jerks, and ignoring others for the sake of “art”, but the general notion is that, everyone needs alone time, no matter their career. Sometimes we get sparks of inspiration that we have to get out at that moment, and being distracted, whether it be through being out in a busy street, or spending a lot of time with people, can cause that once-in-a-lifetime inspiration to fizzle out.

    I find that personally, my mood greatly affects my art and my feelings towards my art–and those factors can certainly be impacted by things such as people distracting or overwhelming me, or even just having tea that’s too cold to drink now. Artists have their own process and way of working, and most of the time, we should respect that.

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  18. I concur that alone time to truly delve into one’s artwork is essential. Of course every artist will draw inspiration from different things, and perhaps sometimes it is other people, models, references, music; but when it comes down to it the art that is made will be from that person’s own interpretations and feelings at that moment in time. Sometimes the best art is created when you have no particular goal or objective, and just try to make something out of “nothing.” I do suspect this alone time could be applied to situations outside the studio, and could also be used when sudden sparks of inspiration strike even in public spaces. When you are focused and want to do your work, sometimes the world around you can fall away, in a more figurative sense in this instance.

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  19. Being alone for some people can help them come up with their most creative ideas. Some of the most beautiful pieces of artwork are made out of personal feelings of or towards something. With alone time, an artist has time to explore their true feelings and express them in a way that they way not have ever been able to before. In my case, I find having new experiences leads me to my ideas. Being alone might not help me as much as it might help others.

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  20. I find Lee Krasner’s insight of her “inner rhythm” and “voice” very appealing as I can completely understand her perspective on having our own alone time. I believe that having our alone time and listening to our inner voices can be applied to a lot of aspects of our lives. Especially for artists, being alone can help foster inspiration and allow them to be more comfortable with complex and ambiguous feelings. They don’t necessarily have to worry about outside distractions as being in this time of solitude brings their focus more towards their reflection and psyches in ways other people might not see. In that sense, I also believe that being alone and immersing ourselves in our subconscious minds takes as much discipline as it is about freedom. I think that understanding the reason why we choose to be in solitude is to know patience and unpacking our perceptions to make sense of the world and our place in it. I believe that by acknowledging our inner self in these times of solitude are we, artists, and everyone else able to find our source of inspiration and make the most of opportunities that come to us.

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  21. I feel that alone is vital towards every individual. This alone time can help put the artist in a creative mindset and allow for them to think about their thoughts and ideas without being interrupted. I feel as if alone time can be directed outside the artist’s studio or even within it. It really just depends on the artist and how they work and think. Personally, I prefer to think and work alone. This is when I feel most relaxed and comfortable, and can put in my best effort.

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  22. I completely understand what Lee means and I am sure many of us can also understand when she says she needs to be alone for her to maintain her own rhythm. When an artist is left alone, the only thing that matters are the canvas and themselves. When alone, one can easily reach certain emotions and feelings within themselves that would not be possible with others being in their presence. Being alone in a way is meditative as well. It lets you gather your thoughts and lets you reflect upon yourself. Alone time can be applied to all types of situations outside as well. Being alone nowadays is looked down upon, but at the end of the day, everyone needs the solitude to be able to collect themselves and keep moving forward.

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  23. I personally disagree with the statement that an artist should ” be alone for certain periods of time or I violate my own rhythm.” I believe that it is important for an artist to explore all parts of them. I respect the “alone time” that Lee Krasner is talking about as it is an essential time to find your own-self, but I believe that one’s aspect or characteristic that comes out when one is with someone else is also a part of that person; one may act different when they are with someone, but I believe we can’t deny that “acting different” is one characteristic of that person because it’s the choice that one had made in unconscious. For the same reason, I do not want to say that “alone time” should be applied inside or outside a studio.

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  24. I agree with Krasner’s statement. To be alone means one can have her own time to reflect, meditate. If she doesn’t have the time to stop and think, she could end up not spending enough time to learn the consequence of an action, in a way, it violates one’s own rhythm. I can see how “alone time” can be applied to situation outside of the artist’s studio. As an artist, sometimes I get bored of my surroundings, my work space. Having another place to go and explore temporarily frees my mind from stress. Also, inspiration can be find everywhere, spending time outside of the artist studio can encourages artist to find inspirations for her work.

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  25. I fully understand how an artist would want to be alone for the sake of maintaining rhythm. I believe that a lot of people work differently and just like myself, I am sure many others out there are at their best when they are alone. For example, I know for a fact that I am at my best working at night, listening to music, and with little to no distractions. I cannot say that everyone else is the same, but I am sure that there are many just like me, and to disturb an artist from such a rhythm could be detrimental to having a continuous and productive work schedule as well maintaining the ability to create more meaningful work. As for the second part of this question, I definitely believe that this alone time can be also associated with time outside of the studio because again, some of us work and are able to think better while alone. That isn’t to say that we cannot talk to said person, but we should also keep in mind that time outside the studio can also be time thinking about what to work on next and the like.

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  26. I think everybody whether they are artists or not needs to have alone time eventually, especially since there is always so much going on in the world. Some people just can’t be around others for a long period of time so when she means rhythm she probably correlates it to her happiness. I know for me personally, I like to have a lot of alone time to not only do my creative work but also just relax and do whatever I want. I feel if I am around a lot of people when I am doing my work it can distract me from what I am doing and maybe Krasner feels the same way.

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  27. In my opinion, if I were actively looking for an architectural firm for my dream home, the firm’s credentials would need the ability to specialize in the style I am trying to obtain for my dream home. In learning about the husband and wife team of the Philadelphia-based architecture firm Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates (VSBA), who are known for their creative and exciting/unique places, I agree that they need to have the ability for different forms or styles.

    Now, if building or redesigning a structure for me as a company was the issue, VSBA would be my 1st choice. Hiring a firm for my dream building being used by many diverse inhabitants, with the firm’s solid reputation for unique design work that is cutting-edge yet discipline in making the meeting place useful and attractive, is the first reason. Having planners, programmers, graphic designers, and project managers at the ready and in-house is critical and helps keep the cost down, and the project flow more smoothly is the second reason. Knowing that VSBA has a portfolio of cultural institutions, adaptations, and additions to existing buildings and VSBA’s would be the third reason, making them the right choice for me.

    CeCe Kay

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  28. What are your thoughts when you read an artist telling you she needs” to be alone for certain periods of time or I violate my own rhythm? Do you suspect this “alone time” may be applied to situations outside the artist’s studio?

    I think for any artist, we have such a strong influence from other artistic individuals and their work. That we need to take our ‘alone’ time in order to re-focus, and find ourselves deeply concentrated on our own personal creations. Without these distractions, we need to spend time focusing on our own personal style, and creative responses. This is where we can truly express ourselves as an individual, and as an artist. I believe this idea of ‘alone time’ should be applied to different situations outside of the artist’s studio and within our lives. To promote a strong sense of mental health, there are many different things we can do to create this, whether it means to be around people or not.

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  29. ART 477

    Dear Professor Tracy,

    In defining ‘alone for certain periods of time or I violate my own rhythm,’ I suspect the “alone time” may be applied to a situation outside of the artist’s studio since I feel that alone time is just that. Being alone to think of all the possibilities, one has to reflect on oneself and the things going on in one’s life and surroundings.

    Creating ones’ work as an artist and getting your emotions together is vital in art, and finding opportunities to create new works from the world around us. As Lee Krasner explains, the inner rhythm can be a chance to allow one to find their inner voice. Something we all should do “I listen to it and I stay with it.” (Lee) The educational experiences molded Lee and enabled her to realize that you can only paint what you are about and for this, you need “to be alone for certain periods of time.” (Lee) You need to define character, understand, and learn communication/expressionism to become a painter or just become oneself.

    So in conclusion, I believe it not only pertains to the artist’s studio but situations outside.

    Kindest regards,

    Sydney-Paige Kay

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  30. ART 477 ART Since 1945”
    I never violate an inner rhythm.
    Due: September 6, 2020

    Dear Professor Tracy,

    In defining ‘alone for certain periods of time or I violate my own rhythm’, I suspect the “alone time” may be applied to a situation outside of the artist’s studio since I feel that alone time is just that. Being alone to think of all the possibilities, one has to reflect on oneself and the things going on in one’s life and surroundings.

    Creating ones’ work as an artist and getting your emotions together is vital in art, and finding opportunities to create new works from the world around us. As Lee Krasner explains, the inner rhythm can be a chance to allow one to find their inner voice. Something we all should do “I listen to it and I stay with it.” (Lee) The educational experiences molded Lee and enabled her to realize that you can only paint what you are about and for this, you need “to be alone for certain periods of time.” (Lee) You need to define character, understand, and learn communication/expressionism to become a painter or just become oneself. So in conclusion, I believe it not only pertains to the artist’s studio but situations outside.

    Kindest regards,

    Sydney-Paige Kay

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  31. Krasner’s statement may mean that without giving herself the gift of time, her body and mind may not function properly or to their full potential. Time to reflect alone, similar to needing a friend, is intuitive. If you feel that the company of only yourself is something you require, I definitely believe that should be respected. It seems like Krasner understands herself quite well and is able to regularly schedule this time for herself. I wonder if it is possible to fall into a severe isolation without being sure to balance this, however.
    Periods of alone time outside the studio can be important as well. Even for non-artists, I feel there are insights to be gained from the undisturbed thoughts of a mind by itself. Without the influences of others, personal choice is placed front and center. Where your mind chooses to wander at that point is a complete freedom. This liberates one’s own thoughts, and thoughts become paintings.

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  32. I think that Krasner’s statement is to show that she needs her personal space to be productive. Sometimes people, especially creative individuals need to take their time alone. An artist needs a break from the surrounding noise and distraction. This hime alone can help to clear her mind and reset her mind. I believe that the “alone time” can be applied, both in the art studio, and outside. It depends on many things.

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  33. We live in a world where we are in constant contact, and being alone is a definition that doesn’t matter. However, the peace, silence, and mental loneliness you experience when you are alone with yourself will allow you to get rid of daily life stresses. Science even confirms that spending “alone time” makes one a calmer person. Either you’re an artist or not. Lack of connection with the inner-self makes you feel like you only exist instead of living. The artist needs this isolation from the reality of the outside world. I feel like that’s the proper way not to violate your inner-rhythm and interpret the outer world without being influenced by external noise.

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  34. I felt bad for Lee Krasner while reading this short passage, it seemed like she put into the shadow of her late husband, Jackson Pollock. She had to put her art career on hold to promote his, but eventually she got back to her own space to make work that was for her. When she stated she needed some alone time in order to not mess up her own rhythm I initially thought of her time outside of the studio. For me, when I need to be alone when it comes to art it means I need to take a step back from the work I am doing. I work best when I am isolated and I socially distance myself, but I work even better when I take a step away from my art and have some time for myself. In these moments I can look at my own art work not as the author, but from a viewers perspective. I can then evaluate what I like or dislike about my art and expand on it from there. If I work on a piece for too long without a break then I notice my quality of work starts to drop. Similarly, if I step away from art for too long the same happens. I feel like the situation might have been similar for Lee Krasner when she had to put her own career on hold in order to promote her husband’s work.

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  35. I don’t think he would have given Robert it if it was something that was EXTREMELY important. Being said I think that it was an ingenious thing to do. By him erasing the sketch I believe Robert was just trying to put a different meaning to Kooning’s work. He thought of him as an idol and added his own original spin to his idol’s work. That is brilliant. It is compelling to say the least.

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  36. Having alone time can really help when trying to create. I feel like this helps with everything, not just with art. I am a person who can get distracted very easily and when I have some alone time with peace and quiet, I can really get things done and align my thoughts. It can also be used as a kind of reset of your mind because being around distractions and noise and stress can be very detrimental to your psyche and having those moments of quiet can just calm you down and allow your mind to open.

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  37. From the artwork, I could tell that the artist in question needs a lot of time, effort, creativity, and patience in order to complete their works of art. The reason why is because based on the style and form of each artwork I could see the kind of work the artist used for it.

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  38. I did a research project on Lee Krasner for my Art Since 1945 class! I see a lot of similarities between her and myself! I definitely need lots of alone time. The world and other peoples’ minds are so noisy sometimes. I need to just be alone with my thoughts and in my space. Art takes a lot of time, patience, space, etc. It just requires a lot of things that are unusual for ‘normal’ people. Artists definitely need to work with the rhythms and energies! The waves of creativity! If these waves get interrupted it’s not always easy to just jump right back in. Conditions must be right or you can end up ruining your work! I find it interesting she mentioned needing this alone time to recharge, because after her husband died, she moved her studio into the barn and now all she had was alone time and art supplies. It was during this alone time where she created some of her best and most famous works. Like Lee I lost someone I loved deeply and ever since I have been mostly alone and I have created the biggest body of work in my life and I am really improving. I am so happy to be taking art classes because to learn about artists of the pasts and seeing similarities makes me feel not alone, and part of a community of the coolest people ever!

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  39. Alone time is really important to me. It helps me recollect all my thoughts and really plan out things I need to get done or things for myself. I usually like to listen to music on my down time. Music is like a rhythm and it really connects to my art while I’m creating something or if I’m just taking a stroll through a park. When I’m stuck while creating art being in a silent room really helps. Therefore, alone time can really come in handy as an artist.

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  40. In her case, I would guess that her “alone time” probably applies to other parts of her life. Art is something that stays with you, whether or not you’re actually in the studio or not. Krassner needs the time to gather and flush out her ideas and focus to comprehend all the senses she was experiencing. She can literally be alone or she can be alone in a metaphorical sense of confronting her thoughts and experiences. Artists value their own individual uniqueness, so I’m sure she values the time to figure out what inspires her and what she wanted to express. Her sense of self and “the key within” are extremely important to her when she creates and she needs time to fully birth it into her art.

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  41. In her case, I would guess that her “alone time” probably applies to other parts of her life. Art is something that stays with you, whether or not you’re actually in the studio or not. Krassner needs the time to gather and flush out her ideas and focus to comprehend all the senses she was experiencing. She can literally be alone or she can be alone in a metaphorical sense of confronting her thoughts and experiences. Artists value their own individual uniqueness, so I’m sure she values the time to figure out what inspires her and what she wanted to express. Her sense of self and “the key within” are extremely important to her when she creates and she needs time to fully birth it into her art.

    Like

  42. In her case, I would guess that her “alone time” probably applies to other parts of her life. Art is something that stays with you, whether or not you’re actually in the studio or not. Krassner needs the time to gather and flush out her ideas and focus to comprehend all the senses she was experiencing. She can literally be alone or she can be alone in a metaphorical sense of confronting her thoughts and experiences. Artists value their own individual uniqueness, so I’m sure she values the time to figure out what inspires her and what she wanted to express. Her sense of self and “the key within” are extremely important to her when she creates and she needs time to fully birth it into her art.

    Like

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