The New York School of Abstract Expressionism…

“I think very few of the artists involved in Abstract Expressionism were interested in Expressionism, and I think that the so-called Expressionist element has to do with a certain anxiety and certain violence that I think is in the American scene. Abstract Expressionism was the first American art that was filled with anger as well as beauty.”

(Robert Motherwell, in Painters Painting, documentary, 1972)

Our assessment of Abstract Expressionism or AE, starts with our gaze turning to New York City after WWII. Our jumping off point involves the AE Irascibles—a group of rowdy, creative, and often drunk Greenwich Village artists, as well as avant-garde writers/poets, who gathered at the famous Cider Tavern Bar and Restaurant (24 University Place between E. 11th and 12th Street) The creative class in Greenwich Village liked the Cedar Tavern as it was the preferred watering hole for artists/writers/poets and was noticeably absent of tourists or the middle-class “squares”. Cedar Tavern served as an important “incubator” of the emerging avant-garde following WWII.

Where do artists today go to socialize with their fellow avant-garde and develop threads of discussion outside their respective studios? Is this form of friendly dialogue between the creative class still important today? Where do you find the threads to understanding the art of your generation?

Cedar Tavern, NYC 1950s
Greenwich Village, NYC 1950s

Published by: roberttracyphd

Academic professor at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. I teach theory courses in Art and Architecture History. In addition, I also curate exhibitions on campus as well as in other venues nationally and internationally.

38 Comments

38 thoughts on “The New York School of Abstract Expressionism…”

  1. I think social media is one major way artists stay connected and have dialog with others. We go to instagram, twitter, tumblr, pintrest and more to share our work with other artists. I think this form of communication is vital to the art culture in today’s time. Social media invites people to create and become more involved in art. Today’s art is about use. Many artists today chose to display their work on clothing or other accessories because it sells well and sends their message.

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  2. If we are thinking physical, I would say a local over-priced coffee shop is where many creatives like to meet with their fellow creatives and talk about their ideas and thoughts. But overall, I believe social media has become one of the biggest and easiest way to have discussions with other artists. Because of social media platforms like Twitter, I have been able to comment on the work of other artists and have them quickly respond to me. I think it’s important to be able to have discussions with each other, whether it’s just complimenting each other’s work or asking questions about it, as it helps us elevate our work. Especially in a time like right now where we aren’t able to physically see each other’s work, social media proves to be an effective way where artist’s can have constructive discussions about art.

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  3. Hello everyone!

    Hope all of you are doing well.

    Here are my thoughts on this week’s question:

    Nowadays, I believe that artists socialize with fellow avant-garde artists through the means of online/social media. Social media is the number one platform for people to easily and comfortably connect with one another especially through these tough times. I imagine that artists use this platform outside of their respective studios as it is readily accessible and allows one to make connections beyond their local area. However, I do think that there are events such as First Friday that allow artists to gather and inspire the community with their works. Although many events are postponed or set to virtual get togethers, events like First Friday are a really good way for local artists to get together. I think that social media as a form of creative class is important as it allows artists to learn and inspire each other. With a wider audience to view work, there’s bound to be a good conversation. But of course, it is no match to talking to someone in person. I find threads to understanding the art of my generation on trendy apps like Instagram, Pinterest, or Behance.

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  4. I will say mostly, artists socialize with their fellow through social media. This form is still important today. Even though the platform of how artists communicate changes, we are still human and we value the importance of friendships and supports. A friendly comment or simply a “like” can encourage artist to keep posting their work. For me, I use social media and art magazines to find the art trend in my generation. Social media is convenient for getting an instant figure of how popular the a trend is. On the other hand, art platform that has more credibility can informed me better on the news of what is going on in the art world.

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  5. As some of the replies may have already touched upon, social media has become a large part of our artistic web. Giving someone a follow or a shout out between two different artists not only means that the two of you are friends or that your interested in their work, but it can also be seen as business; as an attempt to build traction between the two artist to hopefully garner the attention of followers from both sides. Professional emails and universal chat/voice chat programs are also great ways to maintain close ties to people miles away from you especially if you want to work on something together or want to help each other get jobs and so on. I feel that this social web is very important today because the attention of large audience members can often be found online and have become a basis for finding work, gaining attention to your work, and overall different means to make a living as an artist. Not only that, but being part of the community that you have molded for yourself with those around you can help you and everyone else mold the art of this generation.

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  6. I am no artist, however, I do believe in the power of social media. Platforms like Twitter and Instagram have a way of having artist come together to double tap and comment about their works. With one click on a hashtag you can see some of the most powerful and amazing artwork. It gives them a way to communicate thoughts and feelings and to see the beauty in the world of Art. IT is in fact very important still. Like a classmate mentioned, we are at a time during quarantine we aren’t able to see one another. Also with all of the injustices going around right now we are able to see the power of speech through art. So being said artists are able to have conversations about their media through those websites.

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  7. Hello! I hope you’re all doing well and staying safe.

    I think, personally, that where I go to socialize outside of studios is done digitally with other artists, whether it be through social media or group chats online. It’s incredibly important to have friendly dialogue with your fellow artists–I am under the belief that art is something that should bring people closer, whether they are viewers or creators themselves. I also believe that being kind to your fellow artist is one of the key ways you not only improve your craft (thanks to feedback from them) but learn new techniques from them when they share their own work. I know another way I talk with other artists, if we’re speaking physically, is outside of classes, where we can share our progress. Libraries and other spots on campus are good areas for artists to hang out and talk, especially if they share art classes. The threads of understanding our generation’s art are seen plastered all over social media, and the direct contact we have with the artist, rather than simply a painting in a museum, provides a type of experience with art where the artist may directly tell us the meaning of it, if asked.

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  8. As of today, I believe that artists heavily socialize through social/online media. Social media is an easy and quick way for artists to share and communicate with one another, and with large groups of people. This form of friendly dialogue is still important today because artists can share new ideas, works, adive, etc. with the community. It allows for people to express themselves and their work, and to share their thoughts. It helps the artists and community to develop and grow. I find the threads to understanding the art of my generation through apps, such as Pinterest, Instagram, and Twitter.

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  9. Just from my personal experience, connecting in the art scenes are kind of different everywhere you go. While I think that it is a really good idea that artists can have a place to meet and help inspire each other. I’m not sure if it’s only me, but I feel like those art places are kind of idealistic. I have found that places like the Art District or even artsy coffee shops, it always felt extremely cliquey and very hard to break into.

    The only places that I have actually connect with other artists and creatives are the classroom or other smaller events that are easier for artists to talk to each other. I find First Friday events are too large to keep track or pay attention to the other people you’re speaking to in a more personal manner. Smaller art shows have really allowed me to speak and ask other artists to learn about their medium and inspirations. That way, it was easier to exchange contact informations and keep in touch on social media.

    Even though social media like Instagram is extremely visual and is good to show off work, it is hard to communicate on the platform. Surprisingly joining an online community like Discord has actually given me better connection to allow me to speak to everyone and receive useful critiques rather than dry and shallow comments on Instagram.

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    1. Hi Crystal!
      I love that you mentioned Discord. I completely forgot we had such a wonderful resource and it’s crazy because I use it so often. I completely agree with your opinion about Discord and how it offers useful critiques, unlike other platforms. With my experience, Discord servers have helped me a lot in a way that I can easily interact with and share my work with others. I love the fact that multiple people can join the server and have different conversations in text/voice chats at the same time. I feel like my experience using Discord has been very meaningful and has allowed me to gain good connections with other people who have similar tastes.

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  10. Unless you have friends or know other people that are artists themselves, whether it be writers, musicians, photographers, etc., I feel like the main way of socializing with fellow artists is through the internet and social media. While social media has already been mentioned, I think there is an obvious reason/answer as to why. It’s as simple as it’s the platform that just about everyone uses, especially considering we are in the “digital age”. With specific sites such as Instagram, Twitter, and even Facebook, you’re able to connect with anyone, anywhere in the world, at any time. Social media definitely has its pros, and has its place, but nothing can ever compare to in-person gathering/communication. As I mentioned on of the biggest ways you see this is with people you may already know and spending time with and around them. The interesting thing about this form of communication is that you have a say in the spaces you gather. Rather than having to go to a specific place, which in my opinion can include social media. Other than knowing people already, you have places like class rooms/school as well local and even non-local events. These include first Friday, local artist markets and larger nationwide, or worldwide, conventions and events.

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  11. Currently, especially considering the worldwide pandemic, I have found that a primary way artists communicate and share their artworks with one another is through various forms of social media. Social media has opened up new and extremely accessible pathways of communication between fellow avant-garde artists. Now, artists are able to find others like them or share their unique creative works with people around the world. They can not only share their own work but also discover others and subsequently start a conversation with these people. This can lead to in-person discussions and time spent together or it may lead to connections from thousands of miles away. Additionally, in-person discussions may take place in small groups or at artist events, such as an art festival or even a tattooing convention. Keeping lines of communication open is very important to the furthering of knowledge about the modern art movement and the history of art as well as opening new creative pathways between artists that they might embark on together.

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  12. I agree with other peers that most of the discussion takes place on social media. Development of technology made it possible for artists to communicate with broader groups because social media does not limit one’s physical location; on the other hand, I think it also makes it difficult to develop in-depth discussions because social media create an image of only what one person intends to show and because it lacks sincere relationship compared to face-to-face communication. However, I do believe it is a great way to introduce one’s work as any form of a dialogue between creative classes is and will be always important because it gives artists to share and learn from what they have shared.

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  13. From my own personal experience it seems that most artists utilize social media platforms in order to easily reach out and connect with as many artists as possible. With the internet having become an integral part of everyone’s lives its no wonder that current day artists would also have these platforms readily available and set up so that they can interact with others. Simply put, whereas in the past the easiest way to meet and connect with other artists would be in places like studios, galleries, coffee shops, etc now the most convenient way is via the internet and as such online artistic relationships have grown. Although, that is not to say that person-to-person meetings are not without their advantages. In my opinion, an in person meeting is much more suitable for “deeper” conversations with a faster paced back and forth of ideas/ general talking points and it seems much easier to demonstrate and teach techniques to others in this setting.

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  14. I would say today’s artists are having a hard time with socializing because of social distancing and all. Not only that but many big conventions are being cancelled because of COVID 19. I would say now artists are socializing through zoom or any online video chatting platform since it is safer than meeting in person or at a specific location. I would say it is absolutely important that there is a dialogue between the creative class because often times that is how individuals get most of there ideas/ inspiration. I know for me personally that I get a lot of help/ideas from my other classmates. I think a lot of the art from today is based on modern issues/topics. This is why it is important to stay up to date on the news and trends that are out there by going on social media and watching/reading the news.

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  15. Hello everyone,
    I consider myself an artist, art historian and designer. I believe that artists can socialize in many ways. It depends on city and country of residence. I have noticed that in the United States artists like to socialize more online than in person. For example on social media, artists like to share art work. Probably Behance, Instagram, Pintest and Facebook are the best social medias for artists. However, there are still physical artist communication methods. When it comes to in person communication it can be in cafeteria, art festival, exhibition, event, etc. I am originally from Sofia, Bulgaria. I have noticed difference in artists preference of communication. For example in Bulgaria local artist prefer more in person interaction than virtual. There are many art galleries and art events happening all year round. Bulgarian artists like to visit often exhibitions on fellow artists and share thoughts. Moreover, in the city center of every city there are art cafeterias, where artists and designers can meet and share thoughts. Also, some artists like to meet outside in the park and sit down on a bench or on the grass and to have deep conversation about art. Bulgarian artist are active on social media as well they like to keep their social life both virtual and physical.

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  16. I am definitely going to have to agree with my fellow classmates that the first thing I think of, especially in today’s generation and advancement of technology, is that social media is where artists today would go to socialize and develop threads of discussions together outside their studios. Of course, with the exception of artists who meet in clubs or school or even friends who can find a social gathering somewhere in town like a cafe or some other building for people to come together, social media is the biggest thing for that right now. Especially artists who can meet so many from around the world who they wouldn’t meet in their own areas wherever they live. This generation is growing with technology and is being very reliant on socializing with people online. Even more now that we are living through a pandemic, more people are taking social media and the internet to interact. I do believe that this form of friendly dialogue between the creative class is still important today since many fellow artists can come together. There can be instant replies to conversations and keep it going for 24/7 without any waits if someone couldn’t make it to the gathering and would have to wait next week to talk about whatever it is they talk about. It can even help more for those with social anxiety and are able to speak behind a screen than in person to freely speak their mind with this kind of friendly dialogue. As an artist myself, I use social media and have connected with other artists online about similar interests or even draw together online and share our experiences. It’s a great way to communicate with someone you wouldn’t have found in real if you weren’t given the chance to and do it in an instant from someone states away or even countries away.

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  17. I believe that artists today have been knowledgeable about building their success in the art world through numerous opportunities. From what I have seen, artists have supported each other in ways such as attending gallery openings and art events, hosting workshops, as well as networking on social media. Through these kinds of interactions, artists are able to share their creative ideas and construct a network that they can build their careers while supporting the art community. An art scene that I can imagine having this kind of social interaction amongst artists is in the Las Vegas Arts District where artists can create and showcase their work and host art festivals such as First Friday. I believe that socializing in the art world has remained as an important aspect of understanding the art and culture that is relevant in its time. Social interactions with artists have become more innovative where creative energy and source of inspiration can come from many places.

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  18. While standard social media (Instagram, Twitter, etc.) undoubtedly serves as the main platform for sharing content and ideas, there were always gatherings in-person that served the same purpose, prior to the pandemic. Monthly events like First Friday here in Vegas alongside weekly or biweekly events like Farmer’s Markets at parks or outdoor malls were examples of this. Fortunately, many of these events have transitioned to online streams where showcases can still reach the public, and virtual payments allow artists to profit as well. Websites such as Etsy or Redbubble are also widely accessible to the public and allow artists to sell their work (posters, shirts, stickers, etc.) through a trusted platform, thankfully allowing them to receive recognition and income even without in-person interactions. I think friendly dialogue between artists, regardless of whether they explicitly share the same style, is incredibly important. Since negative responses to art still so widely distributed, having positive comments and constructive (thoughtful) criticism within the respectful part of the community is crucial to helping artists continue their craft.

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  19. I believe the concept of ‘avant-garde’ is becoming more common place in the modern age of art. Bizarre works of art that were once only able to be viewed at exclusive shows or museums can now be photographed or streamed into a virtual data bank that can be accessed by almost everyone. The concept of the internet is a double edged sword for many artists, on one hand it makes art easily accessible. Digital copies of art can be viewed and shared at the click of a button. Public chat rooms and forums allow, not only artists, but viewers, to comment, appreciate and give criticism to the work of the artist in a more accessible space. On the other hand, having such a vast forum to present yourself creates a lot of competition in the artistry market. One’s art can be lost in the sea of other digitally shared works. Some could even argue that online art promotes quantity over quality, and it becomes more about marketing than the art at some point.

    The back and forth between the creative class and the viewing class is important today because the artist is nothing without the patron. An artist can create amazing works, but if he has no value in the market, or does not share or have a need to appeal to the viewer then the artist has a slim chance of turning a profit and making a living out of art.

    I personally do not use social media all too often, and find myself talking about art in my art classes. I like the ability to see the art work in person, and I like to share my work out in the open where I can receive live comments and criticisms.

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  20. I think developing threads of discussion is important for today’s artists. Talking about ideas and concepts help artists formulate and flesh out their own ideas. I feel an artist needs to maintain this dialogue especially during this unprecedented time. Prior to the pandemic, I would go to shared studio spaces, workshops given by other artists as well as art openings. During the pandemic, we are finding creative ways to stay in contact with each other. My friends and I are doing a once a week zoom meeting so we can socialize and paint with each other. I am also visiting virtual gallery and artist talks. It doesn’t substitute for having that person to person interaction, it is what we need to do during this time to stay safe and healthy.

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  21. With emerging advancements in technology and social media, artists now have the opportunity for their platforms reaching people in the span of seconds. I think social media has done wonders for communication between artists and their audiences, as those are the ones that can actively support their careers. I think there is something to be said about the financial opportunities that have developed through social media for artists. Many of them now can financially support themselves through Youtube, or sponsored content through Instagram ads, and that’s not even adding on the money from personal shops and businesses. However this is not to devalue face-to-face contact in the art industry, however, artists are just finding the best way to evolve with the times.

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    1. Hi Taylor!

      I totally agree with your statement about the face-to-face contact in the art community. I believe it is just as important as interacting with artists online. It just seems that social media has more opportunities readily available and that’s why it’s so easy to reach out to others much faster than in-person.

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  22. For most artists today, the most effective way to socialize with other creatives would have to be on the internet, especially through social media apps such as Twitter and Instagram. On these apps, one could get all types of feedback of their art from around the world. The barrage of likes and comments on their posts are the forms of dialogue artists use to dictate how their pieces are in current times. Depending on the amount of likes and comments, an artist could even use those statistics to help them think of ways to improve/change their pieces.
    Although those apps are the most popular social media platforms, I feel like one would only get so far with feedback such as that. If one wanted to find a more effective way to communicate with one another, joining a Discord server or subreddit on Reddit that are solely dedicated to art would seem much more effective in growing as an artist. Most of the threads that I use to understand the arts of my generation would have to be through apps like Instagram, Twitter, Reddit, and even YouTube.

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  23. There a lot of artist that socialize through the social media with their electronics devices through Instagram, YouTube, Twitter, and Patron. These platforms help them communicate with the outside world. This form of friendly dialogue really get ideas flowing and inspiration for the artist to creative their next projects. I still think that meeting face to face is still really important to communicate with other artist and seeing their work and it has it own authentic experience for artist to observing get better. Threads could be found all over this platforms and there is also discord groups that you could communicate with other peers to grow and understand previous and newer generations.

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  24. In an age where technology heavily impacts our lives, artists stay connected through social media and online more than ever. There, art they post can be shared with others who like it for any reason. The avant-garde types of pieces will certainly get a discussion going more so if the artist were to reveal a painting in a tavern today. It is important to keep a conversation going in the public to help spread awareness of social issues and to help eliminate bigotry, and this could be achieved with the avant-garde styles of art; it all starts with one artist to encourage others to create more expressionism art. There are more personal ways to keep in touch with other fellow artists that is not so public like social media; there can be private critiques (now virtual due to the current pandemic) with artistic peers, and the use of group chatting for like minded people. I personally use Discord (as someone as mentioned already). There is a channel just for UNLV art students in which I am a part of, but there are certainly other channels for other types of art as well in general. It is a supportive system and encourages us to express ourselves more.

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  25. Hello everyone! I hope you are all well.

    Like everyone else, I agree that social media is one of the most powerful tools to connect with other artists, especially with the current pandemic going on. We live in a time where many people digest heavily in social media and are more likely to find art online than they do in person. Not only that, artists typically rely on these online platforms to get themselves involved more. But, that doesn’t ignore the in-person interaction we get to experience (eg. First Fridays, conventions, art shows, etc.). I use Instagram, Reddit, and other forms of social media to better understand the arts of my generation. Not only that, it helps me keep track of the current trends and upcoming events that could be happening soon.

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  26. Lizbeth Ramirez | Art 477

    I’d have to agree with my peers that social media is the virtual hang out spot many artists go to promote their work or look for other artists. I’ve gotten to know more artists through TikTok than I have ever before. On this particular application, the algorithm is set in a way that it’s easier for one to reach larger audiences. It’s a super accessible platform that helps build supporters.
    I feel like the type of dialogue I see more with modern aspiring artists is more political than anything. I’ve seen a lot of work that comments on the current pandemic, BLM, trafficking, abuse, and mental illness. Many artists are trying to use their platforms to advocate for things that need change. These social media platforms have become such an easy resource to promote and view work. It is especially useful in times like today.

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  27. As the art world and medium has evolved through technology, so have our connections as artists. Outside of a pandemic ridden world, I believe artists like to collect in spaces where they feel they can express themselves. For a local perspective, a lot of artists from all different mediums like to congregate in Downtown Las Vegas, more specifically the Arts District. These types of spaces enable conversation and expression that draws artists all around. In a more day to day and global perspective, I think social media is our best form of congregation. There are a lot of different websites and communities for people to connect and share their works. Now, more than ever, it is easier to have your art and work exposed for others to see and to be able to get feedback as well. I can create an Instagram page for my work or for a brand that I’m working on and I can create exposure for myself.

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  28. I think that in our day and age, our generation of artists is both incredibly fortunate to be so connected at the tips our fingers but so quickly disconnected at the same time.
    With technology consistently expanding, its much easier for artists to share work, gain inspiration, network and connect with others through social media apps, forums and threads, group chats, etc. At this same time though its very easy in disconnecting sometimes from true interaction and inspiration with other artists. I don’t think that any from of technology will ever be able to replicate human interaction.

    Dialogue between artists, I feel, will and always will be incredibly important to our industry. Especially in a major like mine, which is graphic design, without the push for dialogue and push for newer generation of inspiration in design and creativity, things wouldn’t look the way that they are. Everybody would look like each other and designs and art you’d see I feel would eventually all look similar to each other. We need that creative process in collaboration to push forward what is capable with expression and conveying message in any art form.

    Nowadays, the internet is so vast and there are so many outlets for finding any specific niche you would have. Finding any specific art or any specific community in the industry could easily come down to just looking up “art in our generation” on YouTube or sifting through artists on Instagram. Nothing is private in this world anymore, no matter how much we like it or not.

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  29. Just like many other of my peers on this blog, I think we all tend to “meet” each other through social media. We post our works on Instagram, Twitter, DeviantArt, Tumblr, Discord, Etc. and that’s where we gain feedback from others and harness support. We follow each other in efforts to help each other out to get more well-known within the art community of individual social media platforms (because sometimes the algorithm of the platforms cause our work to go unnoticed and swept under the rug). This is probably the best day and age to get noticed out there for your art, because the opportunity to discover and explore artists out using social media is so accessible.

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  30. Since I am from New York, I heard of Cedar Tavern I mentioned it to my mama, and learned that Bob Dylan used to go there and my dad in the 1960s. My mother said the students in School of Visual art and FIT and Parson would head over to Greenwich Village and Willamsburg in the 1990s for the artsy scene. She also told me that the museum was free for art students and the admission fee was just a suggestion, which her friend and she would then give $0.25 to enter the museum and sketch and see exhibits.

    I can speak of places where I would love to socialize with Bushwick people. I believe that artists go to local artsy enclaves like Bushwick/Ridgewood, which is the hotspot for the creative crowd for the last decade since there are many galleries near the border, colorful street art everywhere. They even have an outdoor gallery, Bushwick Collective, that artists worldwide are showcased. At Flowers For All Occasions, an artist-run cafe and bar can hang with other artists and creative people. Another location would be Washington Heights with the best concentrations of pre-war buildings and the South Bronx but still, Greenwich, Upper East Side, Harlem, and Long Island City since the rent just a few years back artsy people lived. Rising rents are the main reason that artists must move. Creative communities to come and go because of this. Friendly dialogue between the creative class is still essential today since, through communication, communities can work, create, mentor, and learn from one another.

    Understanding the art of our generation can be found on social media such as TicToc, Facebook, Instagram, Linkedin, to name a few. I find museums and art schools also a great avenue to take.

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  31. Like many of my peers, I agree that social media has been a huge aid in discovering art and artists. Living in Las Vegas, there are limited places to discover new art that isn’t very mainstream, pop culture icon, First Friday sidewalk art. You can find some however, which I am grateful for. The Nevada Humanities space usually has some interesting local work, along with Priscilla Fowler’s gallery, as well as occasional shows at Core Contemporary. The Sahara West Library gallery is quite special to the art community here, but I think for a feel of the true expression of our local community, murals and the Zap Project power boxes are the best representation of Las Vegas’ art culture and a key starting point in making connections with other working artists here.
    UNLV was, of course, a great place to chat with other artists. I mourn the loss of passing these people or casually discussing things in between classes. I would also regularly go to the monthly life drawing sessions put on by Dr. Sketchy’s, another joy lost to covid. This created the exact type of friendly dialog, in a comfortable and relaxed setting, that is described above and still very much important today.

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  32. Social media, such as Behance or Instagram, are the most convenient way to interact with other artists. It helps to connect directly with the audience without any validation, making the art more reachable and for everyone. However, besides social media, there are more interactive ways to socialize in artist communities such as organizations (Typographic Circle, Association of Illustrators, AIGA.) As a member of the American Institute of Graphic Arts, I want to talk about student groups to encourage students’ professional lives. That doesn’t only create common topics between fellows but also help them understand each other’s art and perspective. This form of a friendly dialogue between the creative class is still important today since we are social creatures, and we influence each other. I believe art is inspirational and influential.

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  33. Today’s artists primarily share their art and connect with other artists through social media. With social media, you can see art and connect with artists from all around the world. You do not really need to go anywhere to experience good art, it is all at your fingertips, plus it is much easier to try to communicate with these artists. Interacting with other artists is very important in that it allows us to learn about different styles and broadens our understanding of what constitutes as art, plus looking to other artists can give us the inspiration to create something new. I am always looking online at social media to look for new artists and pieces of art that interest me or are unique and different from my own. I have connected with artists online before and other artists have connected with me and it is really an amazing feeling when people connect with you and say how much they like your art.

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  34. Usually, the place where artists mostly do their work is in places of silence and creativity. Which can be anywhere they can find and think of in either the outside world or the inside of their home.

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  35. Where do artists today go to socialize with their fellow avant-garde and develop threads of discussion outside their respective studios?
    – I notice a lot of artists and specifically art in general down near Fremont street and around the busy parts of vegas that aren’t extremely mainstream/wealthy areas. Many artists gather to not only appreciate the art and people around them, but to also gain inspiration from it.

    Is this form of friendly dialogue between the creative class still important today?
    – I believe so in terms of marketing and getting your name out of even collab work, but for the most part it doesn’t seem as apparent. Many people are working their way up or scavenging for art would be considered great for friendly dialogue, but more well know names today not so much.

    Where do you find the threads to understanding the art of your generation?
    – The art of our generation is more in value with style and sporadicness, many compositions or art today are trying to find a way to stand out or do something that has never been done, but that’s what makes art today different and sometimes weird. Some artist follow the fundamentals and brings mastery of the style, while some are just frightening.

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  36. I believe using social media is the quickest way to build brand recognition as an artist. Solid brand identity differentiates you from the pack. A strong brand is invaluable and serves to communicate credibility to your prospective customers and business associates. It’s just another way to have a voice for artists and to invite people.

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